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Courts Restrict Where Patent Suits Can Be Filed

Last week, the Supreme Court placed even more limitations on where patent owners can file infringement lawsuits. This decision will drastically change almost 30 years of settled practice, probably pushing numerous lawsuits out of the Eastern District of Texas.

The Supreme Court reversed a ruling that basically permitted patent holders to file suit anywhere a defendant makes sales. Critics stated that this encouraged forum shopping and an aggregation of suits in a few courts.

Justice Clarence Thomas stated in an opinion “We therefore hold that a domestic corporation ‘resides’ only in its state of incorporation for purposes of the patent venue state.”

In Fourco Glass Co. v. Transmirra Products Corp., the Supreme Court ruled that “resides” meant the place of incorporation. However, in 1990, the Federal Circuit implemented a broader rule, permitting patent lawsuits to be filed anywhere that a defendant does business.

After Kraft Foods Group Brands LLC sued TC Heartland for infringement, TC Heartland challenged the statute, encouraging the Supreme Court to overturn the Federal Circuit’s broad interpretation of the law.

A majority of people believed that if the Supreme Court ruled for TC Heartland, a bulk of patent suits would move to Delaware, where a lot of businesses are incorporated, and the Northern District of California, where there are many technology companies.

For more information, see Law360.



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