Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Venue’

IP Firms Changing Their Methods

June 5th, 2017 Alexander No comments

Intellectual property boutiques have acclimatized to increased prices and a deceleration in patent cases after two IP firms have closed down.

Professional state that several IP boutiques have effectively adjusted to the decrease in patent litigation after the passage of the American Invents Act in 2011. They have done this by instead focusing on USPTO proceedings developed by the government. For firms that specialize in patent prosecution, their method has been to cut rates by offering legal process outsourcing and alternative fee arrangements.

Fish & Richardson PC is the largest intellectual property boutique on the Law360 400. Finnegan Henderson Farabow Garrett & Dunner LLP come in second, and Knobbe Marten Olson & Bear LLP at third. In 2016, Fish & Richardson increased its number of attorneys by more than six percent.

Kenyon & Kenyon was no longer on the list after it merged with Andrews Kurth Kenyon LLP back in August.

While several intellectual property firms have gone out of business, others continue to expand.

PTAB

The 2011 American Invents Act developed new types of post-grant proceedings, offering a low-cost method for accused infringers and third parties to contest the validity of the patent at the USTPO’s Patent Trial and Appeal Board. These reviews have increased up to more than 1,700 petitions a year. This has also caused a decrease in district court patent litigation because the cases are being put on hold for IPRs. Consequently, intellectual property firms have lost their ability to get district court work.

However, creative intellectual property boutiques have offered for IPR actions, placing themselves as go-to Patent Trial and Appeal Board attorneys. Ray, the Stern Kessler lawyer, stated that the enactment of the AIA offered an opportunity for lawyers who had some prior USPTO experience to become experts in the new proceedings.

Dealing with Price Demands

Clients are increasingly seeking to cut down on their intellectual property budget after the economic downturn in 2008. According to Ray, recent case law and legislation have also added to this by decreasing the value of the patent. Accused infringers are not likely to pay for a license or settle because now it is cheaper and easier to invalidate patents through an IPR or other post-grant proceeding at the USPTO. Patent holders view this as being more difficult to realize a profit when litigation is not likely to result in settlement or licensing fees. As a result, favorable prices are crucial for firms because companies are doubting the value of a patent portfolio and hoping to get that portfolio for a lower price. Alternative fee structures in addition to legal process outsourcing assists in increasing efficiency and decreasing costs.

Discovering Different Venues

Intellectual property firms are looking for new industries and venues in which they can develop.

The Supreme Court’s ruling in TC Heartland v. Kraft Foods Brand means that district court patent suits will change geographically very soon. Additionally, the U.S. International Trade Commission has become a more attractive venue for patent owners seeking to stop imports of infringing items. ITC cases are different from district court litigation in that they are not stayed for PTAB proceedings. This essentially means that companies are able to receive an order banning imports faster.

For more information, see Law360.



Patent Glory Days Limited for East Texas

April 1st, 2017 Alexander No comments

East Texas has a long-standing reputation as a “patent hotspot.” Judges in the Eastern District of Texas are familiar with patents as they have ruled over numerous cases. Likewise, many potential jurors also have some type of experience with patents. In 1999, the amount of patent cases in East Texas was less than 100, but by 2007, this number skyrocketed to 369. By 2011, East Texas was recognized as a favorable patent location.

Patent holders favor the Eastern District of Texas because of the benefits and advantages that it offers for plaintiffs. To begin with, the discovery process happens fairly quickly and the judges in the district are less susceptible than judges in other districts to summary judgment motions. In addition, there are methods which permit the first parts of a suit to advance predictably without a lot of court involvement.

A high-profile case is putting East Texas at risk of losing its long-established dominance. This Monday, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in a case regarding where patent suits can be filed, specifically Section 1400(b) of the U.S. Code. This statute states that patent suits can be brought “in the judicial district where the defendant resides, or where the defendant has committed acts of infringement and has a regular and established place of business.”

Kraft Foods Group Brands brought suit against TC Heartland LLC in the District of Delaware, alleging infringement of its concentrated liquid dispenser patents. After TC Heartland unsuccessfully moved the case to the Southern District of Indiana, it filed a petition for a writ of certiorari with the Supreme Court. TC Heartland asserts that this statute is allowing patent holders to forum-shop, leading to inequitable results. TC Heartland contends that patent suits should only be allowed be to be filed where a company is incorporated, citing Fourco Glass Co. v. Transmirra Products Corp.

However, if this were to happen, a large number of patent plaintiffs would be forced out of Texas and into Delaware, where numerous companies are incorporated. While a number of people think that limiting where patent suits can be filed would create impediments for nonpracticing entities and reduce the number of lawsuits, others believe that it would have little impact.

For more information, see Law360.

Categories: Uncategorized


Fed. Circ. Refuses To Restrict Venue In Patent Cases

May 8th, 2016 Alexander No comments

The Federal Circuit recently denied liquid sweetener company TC Heartland LLC’s request for new restrictions on where patent suits can be filed. TC Heartland was sued by Kraft Foods Group Brands LLC in the District of Delaware and was seeking to have the case moved to the Southern District of Indiana, where it is based.

TC Heartland’s petition for a writ of mandamus, which urged the court to cast aside a 1990 ruling that patent suits can be filed in any district where the defendant makes sales, was denied.

TC Heartland argued that the 1990 decision known as VE Holding was overruled by a 2011 federal law, and that under that statute, patent suits can be filed only in places where the defendant is incorporated or has an established place of business and has allegedly infringed. The Federal Circuit rejected that argument, calling it “utterly without merit or logic.”

“The 2011 amendments to the general venue statute relevant to this appeal were minor,” the court wrote, adding that the statute was in fact “a broadening of the applicability of the definition of corporate residence, not a narrowing. This change in no manner supports Heartland’s arguments.”

“Boy, doesn’t this feel like something a legislature should do rather than something we should be asked to do?” U.S. Circuit Judge Kimberly A. Moore said at oral arguments.

Although the case did not actually involve the Eastern District of Texas, where the most patent suits are filed, it has been closely watched because a decision restricting venue in the way TC Heartland requested would have kept most suits out of the district, since few patent defendants are based there.

According to statistics compiled by Law360, there were 2,523 new patent complaints filed in the Eastern District of Texas last year, accounting for 45.5 percent of all cases nationwide. The collection of small cities 100 miles east of Dallas saw nearly 2,000 more new suits than the next-busiest court, the District of Delaware.

For more information, see Law360.